Two Feet Down and a Light Dancer

Two Feet Down

Two Feet Down - 2012

A journey into abstraction is an experiment in using color, value and texture to reach for meaning beyond the literal.

Some art can be enjoyed for the pure pleasure of the color and form. At other times a work can also draw the viewer into the process of finding their own meaning. While both responses are valid, is one more lasting than the other?

Light Dancer

Light Dancer - 2012

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Circles

beauty where you find it

Cluster of Snails - 2011

A circle of tightly clustered snails near the water’s surface seems to overlap the circle of rock polished by the action of the sea. Below, an arc highlights a cluster of red globules on the beach next to the round seagrape leaf. While the circle is not always an easy design element to work with, it has always been a powerful symbol and metaphor. These images allude to that power.

beauty where you find it

Arc - 2011

Windows

The World Inside - 2010

A window in a wall between two spaces allows us to look from one space into the other. Looking in, we are often looking from a public space into a more private one. Looking out, we are more often in the private space viewing the more public space beyond. Of course, there are times that relationship is more ambiguous, or even reversed. As a visual metaphor, an open window between two places can also suggest different perceptions of reality layered upon each other and the possibility of movement or exchange between them. The two images here are examples of windows that explore these themes.

the light within

Second Story Light - 2010

Labyrinth at Mt. Washington

edge of the labyrinth

At the Labyrinth's Edge - 2010

Estate Mount Washington in the lush tropical hills of northwest St. Croix contains the ruins of an old sugar plantation and rum factory. The current owners have cleared the bush from around the ruins and invite visitors to come explore the park-like grounds. Amid the ruins is a labyrinth. All are encouraged to walk it in contemplation and thanks.

A labyrinth is an ancient symbol and meditation tool. Unlike a maze which has many twists and turns, dead ends and false paths, a labyrinth has only one path into the center, and the same path back out again. The journey to the center is a metaphor for one’s own journey to their center and back out into the world.

The Mount Washington labyrinth is laid out with smooth and interesting local stones on a bed of soft wood chips. In the center is a bleached brain coral stone surrounded by several beautiful heart shaped stones, one of which forms the background for the image below.

center of the labyrinth

At the Labyrinth's Center - 2010

Pointers in Red and Green

Pointing to the Red

Pointing to the Red - 2010

If there were such a thing as compass points within the picture frame, both of these images would be pointing off to the north-northeast. But they seem to be pointing to something else, too.

green coconut

Immature Coconut - 2010

Subjective Realities

man in purple

Man in Purple -- 2009

Each person’s heritage and life experiences are different, creating unique subjective realities that affect our interpretation of the world around us. I like these images because the feelings and stories they evoke for me tell me something about myself.

The original images were captured at night, handheld, without the benefit of flash. I then enhanced the indistinct and impressionistic qualities to make the images even less literal, and allow the viewer more freedom to reach their own conclusions.

generation gap

Generations Apart - 2009

1961 Plymouth

Police cruiser - 2009

This classic was built at the end of an era of unusual excess in automobile design — the period of flamboyant fins, rocketship tail lights, and copious chrome. This had been a police cruiser, and was restored in that manner with one of the dual headlights converted to a red flasher.

Even in this earlier time, cars had become such an integral part of our cultural persona that we signaled our status, beliefs and view of ourselves by the cars we drove. The extreme design elements of the late 50’s and early 60’s surely said something about who we thought we were and where we thought we were headed.

Tail end (of the era) - 2009

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