Visit of the Happy Fish

Visit of the Happy Fish - 2009

Visit of the Happy Fish - 2009

This guy stopped by the other night, stuck his nose into my private dungeon, smiled and swam off. I’ll probably never know what he wanted.

Tagged!

Tagged!

Tagged!

Tagged! The thanks go to Jala Pfaff. Check out her blog, and don’t miss her website where you will see many more fabulous paintings and pastels!

Since Jala was passing on a combination of two tagging awards, I’ll take my choice with the “Fabulous Blog Award.” This tagging thing is a great opportunity to get to know other artist’s work better, expand horizons, recommend a few sites to others, and maybe encourage folks to stop by to have a look here.

fabulousblogaward1

The rules are simple:
1. Link to the person who tagged you.
2. Post the rules.
3. Tell 5 interesting things about yourself.
4. Pass the award on to 5 others.
5. Tell those five others they’ve been tagged.

A few tidbits about myself:

1. As you can see, I have a flying dog. I like her very much.
2. My dog has her own email account. I can’t give out the address, however, because the spam makes her fat.
3. Spam makes me fat, too.
4. I love the ocean and her many moods.
5. My favorite color changes, depending on the other colors nearby.

Choosing the people I’d like to tag is a little harder. I’m a relative newbie to the blogging scene, and some of my favorite bloggers have just recently been tagged, so I’ll pass them by to “share the wealth” a little.

Tina Mammoser (The Cycling Artist). Interesting blog with notes on her painting process. Be sure to check out her portfolio website, too, for some truly extraordinary paintings.

Watermarks, a group blog from artists making art about water — Since I love the sea so much.

Steven Walker Studios. Take a look and you’ll see why I recommend it.

Linda Womak’s Embracing Encaustic because I think it is an intersting medium.

And for something totally different, how about “I am the Cheese” by planetross to brighten your day!

Sea Grape

When they take the form of a tree, sea grapes have a distinctive shape and silhouette, and an interesting texture with their large round flat red-veined leaves. This one had taken up a traditional position along the shore. The early morning light gave even the green leaves a reddish glow. I eliminated some of the distracting detail to focus on the colors, the light and the simple composition of the original scene.

Sea Grape by the Shore - 2009

Sea Grape by the Shore - 2009

Chocolate Fruit, the Black Sapote

Black Sapote - 2009

Black Sapote - 2009

A ripe black sapote turns a dark geenish brown, and feels soft underneath the thin leathery skin. Sometimes called the “chocolate fruit”, it doesn’t look appetizing, even when cut open exposing the black-brown custard like interior. But taste it. Looks can be deceiving, and expanding one’s concept of what is edible is rewarding.

In fact, after witnessing the making of a sausage or a bag of Cheetos, I bet you’d much rather eat a black sapote.

Locked Out/In

Locked Out/In - 2009

Locked Out/In - 2009

The ambiguity of a locked door… Which side is out and which in? Am I locked out to protect what is in, or locked into my world. Or is what is on the other side locked out to protect and keep safe what is on this side? There must be something important behind that door, but I’m not sure I want to let it out… or to get in. Do you?

Carambola Ice

Carambola Ice - 2009

Carambola Ice - 2009


Here is a final image from the carambola still life series. It feels like ice to me.

It is interesting how such different interpretations can emerge from a series of quite similar photographs of the same subject. Work on the final images was started on different days and the result was determined in part by the strengths of each individual photograph — but also in part on the day’s mood and the path chosen for each at the beginning of my process.

Carambola Dream

Carambola Dream (2009)

Carambola Dream (2009)

Believe it or not, this too started out as a picture of a carambola — a single fruit on a marble slab.

But it is still there — its gentle curves and angular shapes, ripeness, tartness, splinters of color reflected and from within, and the smooth leathery feel of its skin.

Carambola Still Life

Carambola - 2009

Carambola - 2009

The carambola, better known as “starfruit” in the continental US (and sometimes called “five-fingers” in Trinidad and other southern Caribbbean islands), is tart and juicy, and ranges in color from a greenish yellow to bright orange. You can pick them fresh from the tree here in St. Croix, and we have a beach resort and a golf course named for the carambola.

The color, distinctive shapes and shiny, almost leathery texture of three ripe orange fruits sitting on a dark marble slab caught my eye.

Abstracts and Imaginary Landscapes

There is always a distinct tension for me between accessible realism, and the more abstract. By moving too far toward the abstract, there is a danger that the connection points for viewers get lost. The images in this post are part of a series of abstractions inspired by the brilliant color fields of Sandy Point and illustrate this tension.

Breaking Wave (Sandy Point - 2009)

Breaking Wave (Sandy Point - 2009)

I have read that there is a trend toward realism right now. Perhaps that is a response to economic factors, and what sells. Or perhaps it is something deeper, reflecting shorter attention spans, less time for reflection and contemplation, or a need for the familiar in a changing world — and a corresponding desire for art that is comfortable and accessible. If communication is the goal, perhaps a trend toward realism is a good thing. Any thoughts?

Lines in the Sand (Sandy Point - 2009)

Lines in the Sand (Sandy Point - 2009)

Guard Dog at Boiler Bay

I was working on a beach scene, when this little doggie popped into view. Well, I just couldn’t shoo him away, so I let him be the star!

Guard Dog at Boiler Bay - 2009

Guard Dog at Boiler Bay - 2009

Sometimes the unexpected can add a smile to the day.

%d bloggers like this: